THE SECRET
LIFE OF
KIDS 
WHO READ

THEY'RE ACTUALLY BETTER PEOPLE.

SECRET #1

Literary fiction allows us to see into the inner lives of characters and transport ourselves into someone else’s shoes. When kids read, they develop the ability to experience emotions right alongside the characters in a sort of situational test-drive. 

By giving your child a book, you can secretly encourage curiosity and compassion for others—values that will serve your young reader for the rest of their life. 

SECRET #2

THEY TELEPORT THEIR MINDS.

When kids read about a character in a marathon, their brains behave the same as if they were actually running the race themselves.

How? Reading fiction flexes the mind in a way that’s similar to muscle memory in sports, a phenomenon known as “grounded cognition.”

Similarly, Harry’s flying lesson in The Sorcerer’s Stone activates the same neurons in the brain that perceive people in motion.

When we read, we lead a thousand lives from the comfort of our cupboards under the stairs.

SECRET #3

THEY'RE MORE HONEST.

It's true: those old morality stories do influence the truthfulness of your child—just maybe not how you thought. 

Studies show that when books highlight the positive consequences of honesty (think George Washington, bravely admitting he chopped the cherry tree and receiving praise from his father), they have a perceptible impact on young readers choosing to tell the truth.

Interestingly, more negative tales, such as The Boy Who Cried Wolf or Pinocchio, did not promote honesty. 

“We joined Literati’s book club three months ago. Now, my 7-year-old is interested in things like astronomy and coding that she’s only ever read about. It’s incredible to watch her grow.”

LEARN MORE

STORIES SHAPE WHO WE BECOME

Using fMRI technology, researchers at Emory University discovered heightened emotional connectivity in the brains of people who had recently read a novel. This awareness remained strong in the brain for days after reading, proving what we always knew to be true.

Profound books do indeed linger in our subconscious long after we leave their pages—
and as readers, we are shaped by the stories we love.

Readers know and use more words—forever.

You may not think of children’s books as compendiums of scintillating vocabulary—but in fact, story books contain 50 percent more rare words than home conversations, prime-time television, or even collegiate discussions. When was the last time you discussed sea urchins with your colleagues?

They retain that vocabulary.

Kids who read just one book a day before the first day of kindergarten will walk into their classrooms knowing nearly 300,000 more words than their peers. And children who begin school with broader vocabularies will stay ahead of their peers in almost every way.

Looking for the best stories to shape your little reader? Try Literati today and discover hidden gems you won’t find anywhere else.

JOIN LITERATI

— David R.
a Literati Parent from Brooklyn, NY

Science says it best. Kids who grow up reading will develop larger vocabularies, stronger concentration, and improved reasoning skills.

But what about the other benefits?

THEY'RE ALL-AROUND NICER.

SECRET #4

What’s the key to raising articulate, emotionally-balanced kids? Turns out, it might be storytime. 

Reading aloud together gives your child the opportunity to think about characters and feelings in relation to their own feelings. Through stories, they’ll learn the words to describe emotions—which, in turn, empowers them to better understand and control their challenging, complex feelings.

Bonding book moments also have the potential to curb problem behaviors like aggression and hyperactivity by building empathy in your young reader.

SECRET #5

THEY'RE MORE 
OPEN-MINDED.

Reading with your child from a young age does more than improve their language: it also improves their facial recognition skills.

Give your child experiences with different types of names and faces, and you can shape their perceptions of labels and features in a lasting, meaningful way. 

Kids who read about a vibrant range of people, places, and things will retain that open-mindedness about the world as they grow.

And go further in school.

Will your child go to college? The presence of books in your home has a greater influence on your child’s educational success than your income, nationality, or your own level of education. 

Having as many as 500 books at home propels a child three years further in education, on average—but even 20 books can make a difference.

WHICH BOOKS? 

Give kids the best examples to follow. Literati is a subscription that delivers expertly-chosen stories with characters that have great character.

EXPLORE THE BOOKS

Try the leading book club for kids and refresh your bookshelf every month. Literati sends a curated collection of try-before-you-buy stories that explore a vibrant variety of experiences, cultures, and ideas. 

WHAT IS LITERATI? 

WITH BOOKS AS WITH READING: THE MORE, THE BETTER.

© 2020 Literati

View Sources

1. Bookworms vs. Nerds: exposure to fiction versus non-fiction, divergent associations with social ability, and the simulation of fictional social worlds. Journal of Research in Personality, University of Toronto, 2005.

2. Short- and Long-Term Effects of a Novel on Connectivity in the Brain. Brain Connectivity, Emory University, 2013.

3. Can Classic Moral Stories Promote Honesty in Children? Association for Psychological Science, University of Toronto, 2014

4. Reading Aloud, Play and Social-Emotional Development. Pediatrics Journal, NYU School of Medicine, 2018.

5. The Origin of Biases in Facial Perception. Association for Psychological ScienceUniversity of Florida, 2009.

6. Vocabulary simplification for children: a special case of ‘motherese’? Cambridge University Press, Cornell University, 2009.

7. When Children Are Not Read to at Home: The Million Word GapJournal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Ohio State University, 2019.

8. Books in home as important as parents' education in determining children's education level. Science Daily, University of Nevada, 2010. 

SOURCES